Human Resources Policies
Standard working hours

Category: Pay and Benefits

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Policy Statement

This policy establishes the normal hours of work for non-union jobs as 35 hours per week. It determines the criteria for exceptions and the implementation of a 40-hour week for certain jobs, when necessary.

Application

This policy applies to all non-union employees.

Conditions

Jobs may be established as 40 hours per week under the following conditions:

  1. Where employees are required to supervise unionized staff working 40 hours per week Where it is necessary for the first line supervisor to be in contact with staff at the beginning and end of the work day, and the staff work a 40-hour week, the first line supervisory job may be designated as a 40 hour week job.
  2. Where supervisory coverage is necessary for 7/24 operations Where operational requirements are for coverage 7 days a week and 24 hours a day and it is necessary to have supervisory coverage in these operations, the supervisory job may be designated as a 40-hour week job.
  3. Where industry standards require a 40 hour week Where city staff are overseeing the work of non-city staff for the entire shift and the industry workweek is 40 hours, the city supervisory jobs may also need to be 40 hours.

Implementation

When a new job is created, the division recommends whether the job is classified as 35 or 40 hours in accordance with the conditions.

The Compensation and Benefits Unit includes hours of work on the job advice and forwards it to Human Resources Information Systems, Payroll and the HR business unit.

The hours of work are officially recorded on SAP.

The hours of work are stated on job postings.


Salary & Benefits

The wage grade assigned to a job is determined by evaluation of the job's functions. Hours worked are not part of this evaluation.

Non-union staff are considered salaried and any calculations for determining pay are based on annual salary.



Guidelines

  1. Supervision of unionized staff working 40 hours per week

    Where it is necessary for the first line supervisor to be in contact with staff at the beginning and end of the work day, and the staff work a 40-hour week, the first line supervisory job may be designated as a 40 hour week job.

    Alternative options:

    Alternative scheduling may alleviate the need for 40-hour jobs. In a situation where there is more than one supervisor or qualified non-unionized staff on site or in a district, and where unionized staff work from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., supervisors' schedules could be staggered, to provide 40-hour coverage. For example, one supervisor could work from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and another could work from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    If the decision is made that first line supervisors are working 40 hours, there is no necessity for managers to also work a 40-hour week.

  2. Supervisory coverage is necessary for 7/24 operations

    Where operational requirements are for coverage 7 days a week and 24 hours a day and it is necessary to have supervisory coverage in these operations, the supervisory job may be designated as a 40-hour week job.

    Consider legislative requirements. Is there any act or by-law, governing your workplace or type of work that requires supervisory staff present at all times?

    Alternative options:

    If supervisors work a 7-hour day with a one-hour unpaid lunch, they are often on site for 8 hours. In this case 3 supervisors working 7-hour days, in effect, cover 24 hours. Therefore designating supervisory jobs as 40 hours may not be necessary.

    In this 7 day a week, 24-hour operation, do unionized staff work unsupervised at any time during the day? For example, are supervisory staff present during evening/night shifts? If unionized staff work unsupervised for most of the day, management should assess whether every hour of the day shift needs to be supervised. It may be sufficient to have a supervisor working a 35-hour week in these circumstances.

  3. Industry standards

    Where city staff are overseeing the work of non-city staff for the entire shift and the industry workweek is 40 hours, the city supervisory jobs may also need to be 40 hours.

    Questions to ask in these kinds of operations include:
    • Does the work require city staff to be with the non-city staff for the whole shift/day?
    • Is it more important to mirror the industry (where the norm may be a 40-hr work week) or mirror the majority of the corporation (where a 35-hr work week is the norm)?

Approved by

Workforce Strategy Team

Date Approved

December 6, 2001

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