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September 14, 2005
Spadina Museum to celebrate the Women's Art Association of Canada with an evening of art and music
  
Spadina Museum, home of Mary Austin, the Women's Art Association of Canada's
first musical convenor, is the setting for an evening that recreates the spirit
of the Association's early art exhibitions on Thursday, September 22 from 7 to
9 p.m.

The goal of the Association in 1887 was to "open the doors for women" who had
"no recognition or place" in the world of Canadian art. To fulfill its mandate,
the Association arranged for special themed evenings to showcase members'
works, often holding them at their original headquarters on Jarvis Street.
Attendees would shrug off their daily domestic routines, don a costume inspired
by the chosen theme, and enjoy art, music and refreshments throughout the
evening.

On September 22, Spadina Museum: Historic House & Gardens will play the part of
the Association's former headquarters and offer visitors a rare opportunity to
view works created from 1887 to 1950. Guests will view sculptures by Frances
Loring and Florence Wyle, paintings and etchings by Dorothy Stevens, Estelle
Kerr, Ann Arthurs, Mary Wrinch, Helen McNicholl, Mary Dignam and Carolyn
Armington.

In addition, presentations by Douglas Fyfe of Spadina Museum and Jennifer
Rieger, Site Co-ordinator of The Grange, will explore where and how art was
exhibited locally prior to 1920, the year the Group of Seven stole critics'
attention with their inaugural show. The Association's early art critics will
"return from the past" to comment on the proper roles for women and the styles
in which these artists chose to work. The musical element of the evening will
be provided by the Royal Conservatory of Music flutist, James Thompson.

Evolving from a Victorian country estate to an Edwardian city mansion, Spadina
Museum was home to four generations of the wealthy Austin family. Set on six
acres of parkland, Spadina's local and imported fine furniture and décor
reflect many artistic influences, such as Art Nouveau.

Spadina Museum is one of eleven historic site museums operated by the City of
Toronto and is located at 285 Spadina Rd.
Free parking is available next door at Casa Loma.

Spadina Museum's art and music evening is a TO Live With Culture event - a
16-month celebration of Toronto's cultural vibrancy.

Refreshments for the evening will be provided by the Historic Cooks of Spadina.
Pre-registration is recommended. Tickets are $25.
Please call 416-392-6910 ext. 300.

Media contact:
Nancy Reynolds,
Spadina Museum,
416-392-6910 ext. 304



 

 

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