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May 31, 2008
City wins FCM award for greening its arenas
  
The City of Toronto received national recognition for its efforts in creating a green and sustainable city when it received an FCM-CH2M HILL Sustainable Community Award for its Arenas Retrofit Project. Toronto Mayor David Miller accepted the award on behalf of the City at a recognition ceremony held today at the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ (FCM) 71st Annual Conference and Municipal Expo in Quebec City.

Since 2000, FCM’s Green Municipal Fund (GMF) and CH2M HILL have been recognizing municipal governments across Canada with Sustainable Community Awards for leadership in environmental excellence and innovation in service delivery.

The award-winning Arenas Retrofit Project, part of the City’s larger Energy Retrofit Program, won in the buildings category for community-building retrofits that were energy efficient, reduced resources and changed operating practices that reduce energy consumption.

“It’s exciting to see the City recognized for demonstrating environmental excellence. By reducing Toronto’s carbon footprint with programs like the Arenas Retrofit Project, which is part of the City’s Energy Retrofit Program, the City can reduce the threat of climate change,” said Toronto Mayor David Miller. “This helps make Toronto a leading-edge city for greening technology.”

The City of Toronto’s Facilities and Real Estate, and Parks, Forestry and Recreation Divisions partnered with Optimira Energy to give a green facelift to 42 arenas, three curling rinks, seven outdoor pools, 27 community centres and 45 outdoor rinks.

“The Arenas Retrofit Project is an excellent example of City divisions and private enterprise working together, to improve facilities for Toronto’s residents,” said Brenda Librecz, General Manager of Toronto Parks, Forestry and Recreation. “With these retrofits, residents will experience sustainable, healthy facilities with better lighting and improved quality of ice while simultaneously creating energy efficiencies and cost savings.”

“By retrofitting City-owned arenas, the Energy and Waste Management Office has reduced CO2 emissions by 4,300 tonnes - the equivalent of 931 passenger cars. This retrofit provides the City with an estimated annual savings of $1.2 million - and there is more to come,” said Jodie Parmar, Director, Business and Strategic Innovation, City of Toronto, Facilities and Real Estate. “More than 100 retrofit and renewable projects are underway in 97 City buildings as part of the City’s Energy Retrofit Program. We look forward to continuing the good work that has already been done in reducing Toronto’s carbon footprint.”

“On behalf of FCM, I want to congratulate the City of Toronto for winning a 2008 Sustainable Community Award in the Buildings category,” said Winnipeg Councillor Gord Steeves, President of the FCM. “Along with winners in other categories, the City of Toronto’s Arenas Energy Retrofit Project is contributing creative and practical solutions to some of the critical issues of the environment and sustainable development that governments all over the world face today.”

Toronto is Canada’s largest city and sixth largest government, and home to a diverse population of about 2.6 million people. It is the economic engine of Canada and one of the greenest and most creative cities in North America. In the past three years, Toronto has won more than 70 awards for quality, innovation and efficiency in delivering public services. Toronto’s government is dedicated to prosperity, opportunity and liveability for all its residents.

Media contact:
Toronto Parks, Forestry and Recreation Media Hotline, 416-560-8726, pfrmediahotline@toronto.ca


 

 

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