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September 14, 2000
Toronto Works Committee Recommends Waste Diversion Plan to Council (includes media backgrounder)
  
Works and Emergency Services (WES) - Works Committee today approved a
number of integrated waste diversion activities presented in staff's report "A
3Rs Implementation Plan for the City of Toronto." This report provides a
detailed plan for achieving the city's target goal of 50 per cent waste
diversion by 2006 and reducing reliance on landfill.

Committee also recommended WES staff enter into contract negotiations with the
two top-qualified Respondents in the "TIRM" Process' diversion category. The
two Respondents are the consortium of Groupe Conporec, Inc. and Services
Matrec; and Miller Waste Systems.

Councillor Bill Saundercook, Works Committee Chair, stated, "We're serious
about minimizing waste to reduce the city's disposal needs. We've taken solid
steps to increase recycling efforts and we're getting real results. The city is
moving forward to maximize diversion."

Toronto City Council will consider these Works Committee recommendations at its
October 3-5, 2000 meeting.

As of 1999, the City of Toronto has achieved a residential waste diversion
level of 25 per cent, or approximately 250,000 tonnes per year (Blue/Grey Box
recycling - 138,000 tonnes and leaf and yard waste composting - 60,000
tonnes). To achieve the 50 per cent waste diversion target, Toronto must
divert an additional 250,000 tonnes of waste per year by increasing the
recovery of recyclable material and diverting large quantities of organic
kitchen waste. The 50 per cent of Toronto's residents that live in
multi-family residential buildings pose the greatest challenge in terms of
recyclables and kitchen waste. The annual additional cost to the city to
achieve 50 per cent diversion is estimated between $8.4 to $28.5 million
depending on what type of system is adopted.

Barry Gutteridge, Commissioner, Works and Emergency Services commented, "The
3Rs Implementation Plan outlines a variety of issues and opportunities. To be
truly successful, our programs must have public support. We are looking to
Toronto residents for help in capturing the outstanding 100,000 tonnes of
recyclables remaining in our Blue Box program."


Key recommendations include:
  • Adding polycoat containers (e.g. milk cartons and drinking boxes), empty paint cans and empty aerosol cans to the Blue Box Program effective March 1, 2001.
  • Visiting targeted apartment buildings to review recycling collection performance and make recommendations for improvements
  • Consulting with Toronto residents and environmental groups to gauge what changes they would be prepared to make to increase waste diversion
  • In co-operation with Enwave District Energy Ltd., studying feasibility of siting an anaerobic digestion facility on city-owned property to process municipal waste/generate biogas for downtown energy needs
  • Negotiating with Miller Waste Systems; and Groupe Conporec and Services Matrec for the design, construction and operation of aerobic composting facilities for mixed waste and/or source-separated organic materials


For additional information, please refer to:

---------------
Backgrounder

A 3Rs IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FOR THE CITY OF TORONTO

A Works and Emergency Services staff report, approved today by Works Committee
for City Council consideration in October, proposes the following integrated
waste diversion activities. The activities are designed to achieve the city's
commitment to reduce reliance on landfill and to meet its target of 50 per cent
waste diversion by 2006 (divert an additional 250,000 tonnes of waste yearly by
increasing recovery of recyclable material and diverting large quantities of
organic food waste:
  1. Intensify the use of existing recycling and composting programs to divert an estimated 50,000 additional tonnes of materials per year by:
  • Adding polycoat containers (e.g. milk cartons and drinking boxes), empty paint cans and empty aerosol cans to the Blue Box Program effective March 1, 2001
  • Potential implementation of year-round once per week curbside recycling collection and weekly summer time collection of yard waste
  • Retrofitting two downtown rental apartments with automated chute systems for garbage, fibre and containers to determine impact on recycling levels
  • Visiting targeted apartment buildings to review recycling collection performance - make recommendations for improvements
  • City continuing to seek opportunities through its own facilities/agencies to optimize waste diversion
  • City seeking product stewardship opportunities with other agencies (deposit and return systems, mandatory use of recyclable product packaging, etc.)

  1. Enhance the level of knowledge on public opinion, system cost impacts and market capacity related to options for increased waste diversion by:
  • Conducting various pilot projects and research initiatives (focus groups, a public attitude telephone survey, consultation with environmental groups, etc.)

  1. Expand the City's waste diversion capacity by up to an estimated 350,000 tonnes per year of input in order to achieve up to 250,000 tonnes of diversion per year by:
  • Dufferin Mixed Waste Recycling and Organics Facility operational (capacity to process up to 25,000 tonnes annually - expansion potential up to 165,000 tonnes yearly)
  • In co-operation with Enwave District Energy Ltd., study feasibility of siting an anaerobic digestion facility on city-owned property (process municipal waste/generate biogas for downtown energy needs)
  • Negotiate with Miller Waste Systems; and Groupe Conporec and Services Matrec for the design, construction and operation of aerobic composting facilities for mixed waste and/or source-separated organic materials


Re: Toronto's Integrated Solid Waste Resource Management ("TIRM") Process, Category 1, Proven Diversion Capacity - initiation of negotiations Top-qualified Respondents Proposal summary

Groupe Conporec, Inc. & Services Matrec

- based in Tracey, Quebec
  • Proposes to process up to 125,000 tonnes per year of mixed municipal solid waste at the Scarborough Transfer Station
  • Technology utilizes bioreactors to provide accelerated waste composting, eliminating the need to crush or shred incoming waste

Miller Waste Systems

- based in Markham,Ontario
  • Proposes to process varying quantities (50,000 to 100,000 tonnes per year) of source separated organics and leaf and yard waste at the Scarborough Transfer Station or their own facilities
  • Technology utilizes the same Ebara in-vessel composting technology currently being used in Halifax
  • City to conduct public consultation (open houses/tours) re potential utilization of the Scarborough Transfer Station as a diversion facility (designed to include a diversion facility)
  • Toronto currently generates 1 million tonnes of residential solid waste annually of which 25 per cent or approximately 250,000 tonnes per year is diverted - primarily through Blue/Grey Box recycling (138,000 tonnes) and leaf and yard waste composting (60,000 tonnes)
  • To achieve the 50 per cent waste diversion target, Toronto must divert an additional 250,000 tonnes of waste per year by increasing the recovery of recyclable material and diversion of large quantities of organic kitchen waste

Additional "TIRM" Process information is available on the city's web site at
http://www.city.toronto.o n.ca/involved/swm/swmmep.htm


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