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June 9, 2000
Toronto Waterfront Wetland Celebrates First Pike-Spawning Season
  
Parks and Recreation Division - A part of downtown is returning to nature, and
a huge celebration is planned for this Sunday, June 11.

The Spadina Quay Wetland, located at the foot of Spadina Avenue at the water's
edge and nestled between the Toronto Music Garden and Harbourfront, will
celebrate its first pike-spawning season with a multitude of activities for the
entire family. Members of the public are invited to arrive at the garden at
noon to take part in electrofishing demonstrations, guided tours of the
wetland, unveiling of interpretative signage, as well as aquatic tree plantings
in the wetland.

Toronto Parks and Recreation's Children's Garden and Exploring Toronto Programs
will also provide additional children's gardening and music activities as well
as storytelling.

The Spadina Quay Wetlands was officially opened on June 27, 1999. Partners in
the project include the City of Toronto, Toronto and Region Conservation
Authority, and Toronto Bay Initiative.

The Spadina Quay Wetland is part of the City of Toronto's 40-acre waterfront
parkland system. A new home for fish and wildlife emerged on Toronto's
waterfront when a once barren 0.35-hectare parking lot situated west of the
marina at the foot of Spadina Avenue was converted into a natural habitat for
spawning fish, amphibians and marsh birds.

The water's edge boardwalk features viewing platforms and interpretative
signage showcasing the historical Toronto waterfront, the importance of
wetlands, and how fish and wildlife habitat can be restored. A focal point of
the wetland is the display of an award-winning birdhouse/sculpture designed to
recall the cultural history of human activities on the waterfront.




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