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November 18, 2013
Council decisions from Special Meetings of November 15 and 18
  
Over the course of three Special Meetings, which took place on November 15 and 18, Toronto City Council made a number of decisions that affect the non-statutory powers of the Mayor and delegate some of these responsibilities to the City’s Deputy Mayor. Council also reassumed other non-statutory powers.

"This is an unprecedented situation. I can assure my fellow councillors and the residents of Toronto that I will fulfil these delegated responsibilities to the very best of my ability,” said Deputy Mayor Norm Kelly, Ward 40. “I believe that Council will continue to work collaboratively and effectively to carry out the important business of the City of Toronto.”

The Mayor retains his statutory powers under the City of Toronto Act, 2006 (COTA) and other Acts. This includes providing leadership to Council and representing and promoting the City locally, nationally and internationally. COTA provides that the role of a mayor includes promoting both public involvement in the City and representing the City at official functions. The role also includes fostering activities that enhance the economic, social and environmental well-being of the City.

On November 15, Council suspended the power of the Mayor to appoint the Deputy Mayor and the Chairs of the City’s Standing Committees. Council also delegated responsibilities to the Deputy Mayor with respect to the recruitment process for the City’s Accountability Officers. In addition, Council delegated authority to the Deputy Mayor to act on behalf of Council in the event of a major emergency.

At today's Special Meeting, City Council removed some of the Mayor's powers and duties that are not assigned by statute. Council also decided that the Deputy Mayor would be assigned to the role of Chair of the City’s Executive Committee. The Mayor remains a member of the City's Executive Committee.

Council made further decisions today that affect the budget for the Mayor's office. Council directed that the budget of the Office of the Mayor be set at $95,000 for the remainder of 2013 and the budget of the Office of the Mayor for January 1 to November 30, 2014, be set at $712,000, plus the amount of the Mayor's salary and benefits. The balance of the operating budget in 2013 in the amount of $429,880, and for January 1 to November 30, 2014 in the amount of $882,820 be re-allocated to the City Clerk's Office to be administered under the oversight of the Deputy Mayor.

The residents and businesses of the City of Toronto can be assured that City services and programs continue as usual.

See the fact sheet below outlining the statutory and non-statutory powers of the Mayor.

To view the Council documents for November 15, please see the following links: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/decisionBodyProfile.do?function=doPrepare&meetingId=8588#Meeting-2013.CC42
http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/decisionBodyProfile.do?function=doPrepare&meetingId=8608#Meeting-2013.CC43

To view the Council documents for the November 18 meeting, please see:
http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/decisionBodyProfile.do?function=doPrepare&meetingId=8590#Meeting-2013.CC44

Toronto is Canada's largest city and sixth largest government, and home to a diverse population of about 2.8 million people. Toronto's government is dedicated to delivering customer service excellence, creating a transparent and accountable government, reducing the size and cost of government and building a transportation city. For information on non-emergency City services and programs, Toronto residents, businesses and visitors can dial 311, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

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Fact Sheet: Statutory and non-statutory powers of the Mayor
November 18, 2013

Statutory powers of the Mayor:

The Mayor's statutory powers under the City of Toronto Act, 2006 (COTA) and other Acts set out the Mayor's role as the Head of Council and the City’s Chief Executive Officer.

The Role of the Mayor as Head of Council is to:
- Act as Chief Executive Officer of the City
- Preside over meetings of Council so that its business can be carried out efficiently and effectively
- Provide leadership to Council
- Represent the City at official functions
- Carry out the duties of the head of Council under COTA or any other Act.

The Role of the Mayor as the Chief Executive Officer is to:
- Uphold and promote the purposes of the City
- Promote public involvement in the City's activities
- Act as the representative of the City both within and outside the City and promote the City locally, nationally and internationally
- Participate in and foster activities that enhance the economic, social and environmental well-being of the City and its residents.

The Mayor also has other statutory powers including the following:
- Power to call a special meeting of City Council
- Power to consent or not to the election of a presiding officer
- Can chair Council at any time despite election of a Speaker.


Non-statutory powers of the Mayor now delegated to the Deputy Mayor:

At its Special Meetings on November 15 and 18, City Council delegated some of its powers and duties that are not assigned to the Mayor by statute to the Deputy Mayor, including:
- Chairing Executive Committee; the Executive Committee elects a vice-chair from amongst its own members
- Appointing a selection panel for the recruitment of the City's Accountability 0fficers and chairing or designating a chair of the panel
- Sitting as a member and chair of the Toronto Emergency Management Program Committee (TEMPC) and the Control Group which directs emergency operations
- Transferring certain staff of the Mayor's Office to the Office of the City Clerk under the Deputy Mayor's supervision
- Chairing the City's Debenture Committee and the City's Striking Committee.

Other changes made by Council:
- Council has responsibility for appointing the Deputy Mayor
- Standing Committees have responsibility for appointing their own Chairs if a vacancy occurs
- Setting the budget of the Office of the Mayor at $95,000 for the remainder of 2013 and the budget of the Office of the Mayor for January 1 to November 30, 2014, at $712,000, plus the amount of the Mayor's salary and benefits
- Reallocating the balance of the operating budget in 2013 in the amount of $429,880, and for January 1 to November 30, 2014 in the amount of $882,820 to the City Clerk's Office to be administered under the oversight of the Deputy Mayor
- The Mayor can no longer designate or set times for key matters
- The Mayor can no longer elect to speak first or last on agenda items
- Council has removed the Mayor's powers to designate members of certain bodies, determine the urgency of certain member's motions, appoint the Corporation's Nominating Panel, and sign minutes
- Finally, Council removed the Mayor from the Debenture Committee and removed some associated authorities regarding matters under the debentures bylaw.

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Media Contact
Wynna Brown
Strategic Communications
416-392-8937, cell: 416-919-6503
wbrown1@toronto.ca

 

 

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