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April 24, 2007
Exhibit capturing the past of the Cabbagetown/Regent Park development opens at Mackenzie House on May 3
  
Oak Street Re-Invented, an exhibit capturing the original Regent Park development will begin showing on Thursday, May 3 at historic Mackenzie House. The exhibit is presented by the City of Toronto in partnership with the Cabbagetown/Regent Park Community Museum.

Open until Nov. 25, the exhibit allows guests to ‘take a stroll down Oak Street’ which provides a historical perspective of Regent Park North along Oak Street during the late 1940s and 1950s. The exhibit includes photographs of the Victorian-era architecture, objects from the site, the voices of former residents of the Regent-Park complex, a 3-D animation of the street’s evolution, and a display of the new development at Regent Park. Guests will have the opportunity to learn about the public debate regarding social housing in Toronto in the 1940s and 50s.

Toronto Community Housing (TCHC) is rebuilding the original 1947 Regent Park development, and it will be completely replaced with a mix of varied-income residences. The buildings of Phase 1 have been demolished and construction has begun on the first building at the northwest corner of Sackville and Dundas Sts. Daily progress can be viewed on the TCHC website at http://www.regentparkplan.ca/webcampage.htm.

Mackenzie House, a Greek Revival rowhouse built in 1859, is one of 10 museums operated by Toronto Culture, was the last home of William Lyon Mackenzie, Toronto’s first mayor. It contains a recreated printshop, a gallery featuring changing exhibitions.

The Cabbagetown/Regent Park Community Museum is a division of the Cabbagetown Preservation Association, which promotes the rich history of the area. For details on collections, exhibitions, and general information about the museum, visit http://www.crpmuseum.com.

Mackenzie House is located at 82 Bond St., two streets east of Yonge St., just south of Dundas St. Hours are Monday to Friday: noon to 4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. The exhibit is included in museum admission: adults, $4; seniors & youth, $2.75; children, $2.50. For more information, call 416-392-6915, e-mail machouse@toronto.ca or visit http://www.toronto.ca/museums.

Oak Street Reinvented is part of Live With Culture, a celebration of Toronto’s extraordinary arts and cultural communities, shining a spotlight on the vibrant and diverse activities happening in the city each and every day. Live With Culture showcases the vast scope of the city’s culture of creativity and inspires culture in Toronto to become a daily part of everyone’s life. How do you live with culture? Visit http://www.livewithculture.ca the ultimate guide to Toronto’s culture scene.

Toronto is Canada’s largest city and sixth largest government, and home to a diverse population of about 2.6 million people. It is the economic engine of Canada and one of the greenest and most creative cities in North America. In the past three years Toronto has won more than 50 awards for quality and innovation in delivering public services. Toronto’s government is dedicated to prosperity, opportunity and liveability for all its residents.

Media contact:
Fiona Lucas, Acting Site Co-ordinator, Mackenzie House, Toronto Culture, 416-338-0497


 

 

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