City of Toronto  

Living in TorontoDoing businessVisiting TorontoAccessing City Hall
 
All news releases
Last 30 days
By month
Search
   
Newsroom
   
Archived news release by year
  2013
  2012 - 2011 - 2010
  2009 - 2008 - 2007
  2006 - 2005 - 2004
  2003 - 2002 - 2001
  2000 - 1999 - 1998
   
RSS identifier linked to feed RSS
   
   
 
October 19, 2007
Conference promotes employment of internationally educated professionals
  
Today, more than 1,000 internationally educated professionals, employers, and representatives from licensing bodies, educational institutions and associations attended the 5th annual Internationally Educated Professionals (IEP) Conference - an event designed to promote the employment of internationally educated professionals.

Responding to the need for increased understanding of the cultural differences between Canadian employers and internationally trained professionals, employers at the conference gained tools to integrate a greater number of educated newcomers into their organizations. Potential employees learned strategies to overcome obstacles to meaningful employment by connecting with conference participants.

“Employer action and engagement is the single most critical factor in ensuring that the qualifications, skills and experience of internationally educated professionals are recognized,” said Kurtis Kitagawa, PhD, Principal Research Associate, The Conference Board of Canada. “Canadian employers need to build foreign credential recognition and the recertification of internationally educated professionals into their strategic workforce plans … to attract quality workers and take advantage of business doors that newcomers can open for them.”

Currently immigrants account for 70 per cent of labour market growth and it is estimated that by 2011 immigrants will account for all labour market growth.

“Pressure is building on employers who are starting to feel the impact of labour shortages in key professions,” said conference chair Rhonda Singer. “This is creating greater impetus to solve the challenges facing internationally educated professionals and tap into that growing pool of the nation’s labour force.”

The 2007 IEP Conference, presented by Progress Career Planning Institute (PCPI), was supported by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Toronto Community News, City of Toronto, Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, EPIC Educational Program Innovations Center, Chartered Accountants of Ontario, and Information and Communications Technology Council.

PCPI is a business-focused, not-for-profit organization that aligns career development with cultural intelligence to enhance performance in a multicultural workforce. For information about PCPI or the IEP Conference, visit http://www.iep.ca or call 416-439-1825.

Toronto is Canada’s largest city and sixth largest government, and home to a diverse population of about 2.6 million people. It is the economic engine of Canada and one of the greenest and most creative cities in North America. In the past three years, Toronto has won more than 70 awards for quality, innovation and efficiency in delivering public services. Toronto’s government is dedicated to prosperity, opportunity and liveability for all its residents.

Media contacts:
Rhonda Singer, IEP Conference Chair, President, PCPI, 416-439-3037, singer@careerplan.net
Susan Brown, Senior Policy Advisor, Economic Development, 416-392-9487, sbrown6@toronto.ca

Fact Sheet: Internationally Educated Professionals

The Internationally Educated Professionals (IEP) Conference is a unique Canadian initiative providing interactive learning for IEPs and raising stakeholder awareness about existing barriers to meaningful employment. The free, one-day annual forum includes plenary sessions, networking opportunities, workshops and sector-specific discussion groups led by industry experts, experienced facilitators and successful IEPs. The conference is unparalleled in Canada for its particular focus and service to individuals and employers alike.

Purpose
The conference is designed to assist internationally trained professionals find meaningful work in their chosen fields. IEPs learn about Canadian business cultures, how to connect and interact with employers who are hiring, and how to gain Canadian work experience. The conference educates employers about labour shortages and recognizing this valuable segment of the work force.

Sector Focus
Employment trends and opportunities will be covered in the Finance & Accounting, Engineering, Information & Communications Technology, Healthcare and Related Professions, Human Resources, Sales and Marketing sectors.

Host Organization
Progress Career Planning Institute (PCPI) initiated the groundbreaking IEP Conference in 2003. PCPI is a business-focused, not-for-profit organization that provides products and services in career planning and cultural intelligence to enable individuals and businesses to achieve their full workplace potential. Visit www.pcpi.ca for cultural intelligence and diversity-related case studies and articles, or contact them at 416-439-1825 or pcpi@careerplan.net

History
The first IEP conference “Breaking Barriers, Building Bridges” attracted more than 600 participants. In 2006 conference organizers invited thought leaders to develop a plan of action to help remove barriers to full employment and to promote better integration of IEPs into the Canadian workplace. This year more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 countries were in attendance.

Conference Partners
The 2007 IEP Conference, presented by Progress Career Planning Institute, was supported by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Toronto Community News, City of Toronto, Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, EPIC Educational Program Innovations Center, Chartered Accountants of Ontario, and Information and Communications Technology Council.

Media contacts:
Rhonda Singer, IEP Conference Chair, President, PCPI, 416-439-1825, singer@careerplan.net
Susan Brown, Senior Policy Advisor, Economic Development, 416-392-9487, sbrown6@toronto.ca


 

 

Toronto maps | Get involved | Toronto links
© City of Toronto 1998-2017